Catwoman: Selina’s Big Score

June 8, 2008

I’m still not learning. Blurbs are inversely porportionate to the reliability of content. The more they are splashed all over a book’s cover, the more puzzled about the buzz I will probably be when I’m done reading. This is especially true when the writer is also some big cheese, as if he or she still needs the publicity. The presentaton is the message.

As you may guess by now, Catwoman: Selina’s Big Score fails to score big for me (sorry, can’t resist). This title barely comes close to Darwyn Cooke’s real deserving hit, the epic DC: The New Frontier, in terms of both a sophisticated plot and the clarity of his signature broad ink strokes. Surely, it must say something when an adventure’s best action sequence is the one at the start, and its supposedly brilliant criminal plan sounds familiar to anyone who grew up watching Wild Wild West on TV (like me).

The storyline itself isn’t that bad, to be sure; it’s just not the great — let alone greatest — heist narrative in comics those ready gushers make it out to be. Perhaps it’s just me coming to this book after having encountered Ed Brubaker’s recent mind-messing Criminal series, but I do also recall the much earlier Jonny Double, by the Siamese twins Brian Azzarello and Eduardo Risso. And one has to be utterly clueless not to spot the countless bare-faced borrowings from the greatest heist movie of all, The Italian Job.

What I end up appreciating more, though, is the rather clever angles Cooke chooses to spin a tale with. There is much effectiveness in the way the scenes often start and good intelligence in how Faulknerian narrative voices are used to create depth. The turn to tragedy at the end (oops, did I give too much away?) also provides a nice balance to the initial atmosphere of fun and confidence.

Gweek gives himself 6 raps on the head to keep himself going.

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One Response to “Catwoman: Selina’s Big Score”


  1. Wow, marvelous blog structure! How long have you been running a blog for? you made blogging look easy. The whole glance of your web site is great, as neatly as the content!


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